Sexual cannibalism in a facultative parthenogen: the springbok mantis (Miomantis caffra)

@article{Walker2016SexualCI,
  title={Sexual cannibalism in a facultative parthenogen: the springbok mantis (Miomantis caffra)},
  author={Leilani A. Walker and G. Holwell},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology},
  year={2016},
  volume={27},
  pages={851-856}
}
  • Leilani A. Walker, G. Holwell
  • Published 2016
  • Biology
  • Behavioral Ecology
  • Lay Summary Female springbok mantises cannibalize males with high frequency regardless of how well-fed they are. For other species, when females cannibalize without mating, they risk remaining infertile. However, female springbok mantises can produce viable offspring asexually and this may explain the high rate of cannibalism. Nevertheless, as females age they are more likely to mate with males rather than cannibalizing them which suggests that sexual reproduction remains preferable.Twitter… CONTINUE READING
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