Sexual behavior in female western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla): evidence for sexual competition

@article{Stoinski2009SexualBI,
  title={Sexual behavior in female western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla): evidence for sexual competition},
  author={Tara S. Stoinski and Bonnie M Perdue and Angela M. Legg},
  journal={American Journal of Primatology},
  year={2009},
  volume={71}
}
Previous research in gorillas suggests that females engage in post‐conception mating as a form of sexual competition designed to improve their own reproductive success. This study focused on sexual behaviors in a newly formed group of western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) housed at Zoo Atlanta. All females engaged in mating outside their conceptive periods, although there was individual variation in the frequency of the behavior. An analysis of the presence/absence of sexual… 
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