Sexual and seasonal variation in the diet and foraging behaviour of a sexually dimorphic carnivore, the honey badger ( Mellivora capensis )

@article{Begg2003SexualAS,
  title={Sexual and seasonal variation in the diet and foraging behaviour of a sexually dimorphic carnivore, the honey badger ( Mellivora capensis )},
  author={Colleen M. Begg and Keith S. Begg and Johan T. du Toit and M. G. L. Mills},
  journal={Journal of Zoology},
  year={2003},
  volume={260},
  pages={301-316}
}
The honey badger, or ratel, Mellivora capensis has not been well studied despite its extensive distribution. As part of the first detailed study, visual observations of nine habituated free-living individuals (five females, four males) were used to investigate seasonal, annual and sexual differences in diet and foraging behaviour. Theory predicts that generalist predators ‘switch’ between alternative prey species depending on which prey species are currently most abundant, and diet breadth… Expand
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