• Corpus ID: 202545534

Sexual Size and Shape Dimorphism Variation in Caesar ' s Lizard ( Gallotia caesaris , Lacertidae ) from Different Habitats

@inproceedings{M2010SexualSA,
  title={Sexual Size and Shape Dimorphism Variation in Caesar ' s Lizard ( Gallotia caesaris , Lacertidae ) from Different Habitats},
  author={A. M. and Rodr{\'i}guez and Dom{\'i}nguez and C. and Gonz{\'a}lez and Ortega and L. M. and Boh{\'o}rquez and Alonso},
  year={2010}
}
—We compared sexual dimorphism of body and head traits from adult lizards of populations of Gallotia caesaris living in ecologically different habitats of El Hierro and La Gomera. Males had larger body sizes than females, and sexual size and shape dimorphisms were greater in a population from La Gomera than in three populations from El Hierro. Multivariate analyses of variance, using linear and shape-adjusted traits, showed that the populations differed significantly in body and head traits… 

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