Sexual Selection for Male Sacrifice in the Australian Redback Spider

@article{Andrade1996SexualSF,
  title={Sexual Selection for Male Sacrifice in the Australian Redback Spider},
  author={M. Andrade},
  journal={Science},
  year={1996},
  volume={271},
  pages={70 - 72}
}
During copulation, male redback spiders (Latrodectus hasselti: Theridiidae) position themselves above the female's jaws. This apparent male complicity in sexual cannibalism is favored by sexual selection because cannibalized spiders receive two paternity advantages. First, cannibalized males copulated longer and fertilized more eggs than those that survived copulation. Second, females were more likely to reject subsequent suitors after consuming their first mate. These results represent… Expand
Evolution: Sex and Cannibalism in Redback Spiders
  • M. Gage
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Current Biology
  • 2005
TLDR
New research has shown they have evolved two separate sperm storage organs, allowing them to make post-copulatory paternity choices, and enhances short-term survival and mating success after attack by the female and maximises the chances of inseminating both sperm storage sites. Expand
Sexual Cannibalism in the Brown Widow Spider (Latrodectus geometricus)
TLDR
The results support the hypothesis that sexual cannibalism is a male strategy in this species and support the existence of somersault behavior, which was previously known only from the redback spider, Latrodectus hasselti. Expand
Remote copulation: male adaptation to female cannibalism
TLDR
It is demonstrated that sperm transfer continues from the severed male organ into female genitals after the male has been detached from copula, and thus probably enhances paternity in a highly sexually cannibalistic orb-web spider Nephilengys malabarensis. Expand
Female control of paternity in the sexually cannibalistic spider Argiope keyserlingi
TLDR
It is shown that polyandrous female orb–web spiders Argiope keyserlingi (Araneidae) control the paternity of their offspring by adjusting the timing of sexual cannibalism, and that females copulating with relatively smaller males delay sexual cannibalistan, thereby prolonging the duration of copulation, and these males consequently fertilize relatively more eggs. Expand
Sexual conflict over copulation duration in a cannibalistic spider
TLDR
It is revealed that sexual cannibalism after the first insertion is costly for males and it is proposed that these costs arise because females benefit from polyandry. Expand
Value of male remating and functional sterility in redback spiders
TLDR
It is shown that the relative reproductive value of the first two copulations is very high for redback males because they are functionally sterile after each palp has been used once; nonvirgin males are unable to father offspring. Expand
Female receptivity and male mate-guarding in the jewel spiderGasteracantha minax thorell (Araneidae)
TLDR
There is marked size dimorphism in this species, which may be the result of selection for protandry, but this selection pressure does not seem to be counterbalanced by selection for larger male size through either sexual cannibalism or male-male competition. Expand
Female attack is not necessary for male copulatory organ breakage in the sexually cannibalistic spider Argiope argentata (Araneae: Araneidae)
TLDR
It is found that males can break off their copulatory organs without female intervention and spontaneously die during copulation in the silver spider Argiope argentata, suggesting that genital damage evolved in response to sperm competition in this species. Expand
Post-copulatory Sexual Selection in Two Tropical Orb-weaving Leucauge Spiders
TLDR
Female Leucauge have powerful effects on whether copulation occurs, when it will end, whether a mating plug will be formed, and whether the male will survive the encounter, as well as potential effects on post-copulatory female reproductive processes. Expand
Sexual cannibalism in a facultative parthenogen: the springbok mantis (Miomantis caffra)
TLDR
Female springbok mantises cannibalize males with high frequency regardless of how well-fed they are, which suggests that sexual reproduction remains preferable. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 19 REFERENCES
SPERM COMPETITION AND THE EVOLUTION OF NUPTIAL FEEDING BEHAVIOR IN THE CRICKET, GRYLLODES SUPPLICANS (WALKER)
  • S. Sakaluk
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1986
TLDR
The pattern of sperm predominance in doubly mated female crickets, Gryllodes supplicans, was investigated using a radiation‐sterility technique; evidently, mixing of ejaculates within a female's spermatheca does occur. Expand
Male Crickets Feed Females to Ensure Complete Sperm Transfer
TLDR
Results indicate that nuptial feeding of the female cricket functions to deter females from removing the sperm ampulla before sperm transfer is complete. Expand
The Stereotyped Behaviour of Sexual Cannibalism in Latrodectus hasselti Thorell (Araneae : Theridiidae), the Australian Redback Spider
TLDR
It is concluded that male somersaults and female cannibalistic behaviour in L. hasselti are genetically programmed events. Expand
Sexual Selection and Paternal Investment in Insects
TLDR
It is hypothesize that female preference for greater male parental investment may have been the selective context for the evolution of all types of male investment patterns in insects. Expand
Sexual dimorphism and distorted sex ratios in spiders
TLDR
This work presents a new model in which high mortality of searching mature males reduces the adult sex ratio (males: females), relaxing male–male competition and reducing the importance of male body size to favour dwarfing by early maturation provides a mechanism that buffers skews inAdult sex ratio. Expand
The Natural Selection of Sexual Cannibalism
TLDR
Phenomena selecting for sexual cannibalism appear more closely related to paternal investment strategies than to ecological factors associated with other forms of cannibalism, and specific field observations are suggested which would provide quantitative estimates of the expected number of male matings. Expand
SPERMATOPHORE SIZE IN BUSHCRICKETS: COMPARATIVE EVIDENCE FOR NUPTIAL GIFTS AS A SPERM PROTECTION DEVICE
  • N. Wedell
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1993
TLDR
Analysis of comparative data of 28 species of bushcrickets reveals that male spermatophore size is positively correlated with female refractory period, which, in turn, correlates with male fertilization success, indicating that the variation in sperMatophore sizes is better explained by a mating‐effort function than a paternal investment function. Expand
SPERM COMPETITION AND ITS EVOLUTIONARY CONSEQUENCES IN THE INSECTS
The possible advantages to a species of internal rather than external fertilization have frequently been stressed, though one important point appears persistently to have escaped comment. In terms ofExpand
THE STRUCTURE, FUNCTION, AND POSTEMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT OF THE MALE AND FEMALE COPULATORY ORGANS OF THE BLACK WIDOW SPIDER LATRODECTUS CURACAVIENSIS (MÜLLER)
TLDR
A comparison of the structure of the male and female pedipalpi shows that the patella, tibia, tarsus, and the pretarsus of themale are modified and a trigger-like mechanism of extension of the palpal organ is described. Expand
SPERM COMPETITION SELECTS FOR NUPTIAL FEEDING IN A BUSHCRICKET
  • N. Wedell
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1991
TLDR
Phylogenetic studies of coadaptation: Preferred temperatures versus optimal performance temperatures of Australian Lizards and the phylogenetic regression. Expand
...
1
2
...