Sex drives intracellular conflict in yeast

@article{Harrison2014SexDI,
  title={Sex drives intracellular conflict in yeast},
  author={Ellie Harrison and R. Craig MacLean and Vassiliki Koufopanou and Austin Burt},
  journal={Journal of Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2014},
  volume={27}
}
Theory predicts that sex can drive the evolution of conflict within the cell. During asexual reproduction, genetic material within the cell is inherited as a single unit, selecting for cooperation both within the genome as well as between the extra‐genomic elements within the cell (e.g. plasmids and endosymbionts). Under sexual reproduction, this unity is broken down as parental genomes are distributed between meiotic progeny. Genetic elements able to transmit to more than 50% of meiotic… 
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