Sex differences in the locomotor ecology of a gliding mammal, the Malayan colugo (Galeopterus variegatus)

@inproceedings{Byrnes2011SexDI,
  title={Sex differences in the locomotor ecology of a gliding mammal, the Malayan colugo (Galeopterus variegatus)},
  author={Greg Byrnes and Norman T.-L. Lim and Charlene Yen-Feng Yeong and Andrew J. Spence},
  year={2011}
}
Abstract Fundamental differences could exist in the fitness-limiting resources between males and females; therefore, movement strategies might differ between the sexes. We used custom-designed animal-borne data loggers to record the locomotor behaviors of free-ranging Malayan colugos (Galeopterus variegatus). Locomotor behavior, and especially gliding, make up a very small percentage of a colugo's time budget. Furthermore, although glide distance is widely variable, most glides are much shorter… Expand
Ecological and biomechanical insights into the evolution of gliding in mammals.
TLDR
Comparative data suggest that the origins of gliding are often associated with shifts to low-quality diets including leaves and plant exudates, andKinetic data for both take-off and landing suggest that selection on these behaviors could also have shaped the evolution of glider. Expand
Gliding saves time but not energy in Malayan colugos
TLDR
The energetic economy hypothesis for the origins of gliding in colugos and other mammals is not supported and it is likely that other ecologically relevant factors have played a greater role in the origins. Expand
Dynamics of locomotor transitions from arboreal to terrestrial substrates in Verreaux's sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi).
TLDR
B bipedal galloping is not only a reflection of the unique anatomical configuration of a leaping primate, but it may also provide a musculoskeletal and an energetic advantage to sifakas when transitioning from arboreal leaping to terrestrial locomotion. Expand
Diurnal Resting Site Selection and Daytime Feeding Behaviour of Wild Malayan Flying Lemur Galeopterus variegatus in Western Java, Indonesia
The Malayan flying lemur (Galeopterus variegatus) belongs to the Order Dermoptera, and is mainly distributed in the southern parts of Thailand, Indochina, Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Java, Borneo, andExpand
Jumping in the Night: An Investigation of the Leaping Activity of the Western Tarsier (Cephalopachus bancanus borneanus) Using Accelerometers
TLDR
The first application of accelerometers are shown on the western tarsier (Cephalopachus bancanus borneanus), a nocturnal, small-bodied primate endemic to the forests of Borneo. Expand
Canopy parkour: movement ecology of post-hatch dispersal in a gliding nymphal stick insect, Extatosoma tiaratum
TLDR
To effectively disperse from the forest floor into canopies, diurnally hatched stick insect nymphs use gravity and visual cues to navigate, jump to cross gaps and respond to threat or perturbation with self-dropping. Expand
Short Communication: A report on ranging behavior of Malayan flying lemurs, Galeopterus variegatus, in West Indonesia: Relationships with habitat characteristics
Tsuji Y, Prayitno B, Tatewaki T, Widayati KA, Suryobroto B. 2019. Short Communication: A report on ranging behavior of Malayan flying lemurs, Galeopterus variegatus, in West Indonesia: RelationshipsExpand
Foot postures and grasping of free-ranging Sunda colugos (Galeopterus variegatus) in West Java, Indonesia
TLDR
The morphofunctional similarity of the colugo foot with that of early eu archontans suggests comparable behaviors at the base of euarchontan evolution, and underscores the importance of similar behavioral studies for examining functional-adaptive evolutionary scenarios. Expand
Canopy parkour: movement ecology of post-hatch dispersal in a gliding nymphal stick insect (Extatosoma tiaratum)
TLDR
To effectively disperse into canopies, ground-hatched stick insects use gravity and visual cues to navigate during midday, jump to cross air gaps and respond to threat or perturbation with self-dropping, supporting the importance of a diurnal niche in addition to the arboreal spatial niche, in the evolution of gliding in winglessArboreal invertebrates. Expand
Megachiropteran bats profoundly unique from microchiropterans in climbing and walking locomotion: Evolutionary implications
TLDR
It is contended that nonflight locomotion mechanics give a deep evolutionary view into the ancestral locomotor platform on which flight was built in each of these groups. Expand
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 43 REFERENCES
Time Budget and Related Aspects of the Foraging Behaviour of the Yellow-bellied Glider, Petaurus australis
TLDR
The time budget of the Yellow-bellied Glider was determined at a site in southern New South Wales and the amount of time gliders spent in trees was significantly greater when feeding on exudates than when harvesting arthropods and other food types from under loose bark. Expand
HOME-RANGE SIZE, MOVEMENTS, AND NEST-SITE USE IN THE SIBERIAN FLYING SQUIRREL, PTEROMYS VOLANS
Abstract The Siberian flying squirrel (Pteromys volans) is a herbivorous, nocturnal, and arboreal rodent living in boreal coniferous forests. Home-range sizes, movements, and nest-use behavior ofExpand
Tropical Forest Structure and the Distribution of Gliding and Prehensile-Tailed Vertebrates
TLDR
Empirical evidence suggests that different forest structures in different parts of the world are correlated with different modes of locomotion by arboreal vertebrates, and it is suggested that scarcity of lianas in tropical Asia favors the long-distance strategy of gliding and high liana frequency in tropical Africa correlates with a lack of specialized locomotory adaptations for inter-tree movement. Expand
Factors influencing the diving behaviour of fish-eating killer whales: sex differences and diel and interannual variation in diving rates
TLDR
Diving behaviour of air-breathing vertebrates may be influenced by a variety of factors including age, body size, and changes in prey behaviour and (or) abundance over both short and long timescales, though uncertainty regarding the diet of this population precludes determination of the cause of such changes. Expand
TIME BUDGETS, ACTIVITY PERIODS, AND BEHAVIOR OF MEXICAN FOX SQUIRRELS
TLDR
Differences in time budgets of the sexes suggest that males and females apportion daily activity to maximize access to resources that limit fitness of each sex. Expand
Sex differences in the diving behaviour of a size-dimorphic capital breeder: the grey seal
TLDR
The results suggest that sex Differences in the seasonal patterns of diving behaviour reflect sex differences in the costs and benefits of stored energy for reproduction rather than the influence of body size dimorphism alone. Expand
Home Ranges, Time Budgets and Food-tree Use in a High-density Tropical Population of Greater Gliders, Petauroides volans minor (Pseudocheiridae : Marsupialia)
TLDR
Broad overlap of home ranges of males was observed, which has not been reported previously for populations of P. volans, and behaviour patterns for males and females were similar to those in previous studies, although the mating system may differ, possibly because of the high population density. Expand
Take-off and landing kinetics of a free-ranging gliding mammal, the Malayan colugo (Galeopterus variegatus)
TLDR
The take-off and landing kinetics of a free-ranging gliding mammal, the Malayan colugo (Galeopterus variegatus) is examined using a custom-designed three-dimensional accelerometry system and it is found that colugos increase the propulsive impulse to affect longer glides, but also found that landing forces are negatively associated with glide distance. Expand
Energetic savings and the body size distributions of gliding mammals
TLDR
This work uses published allometric relationships to determine an upper limit for body mass in mammalian gliders (flying squirrels, marsupial gliders, colugos and anomalurids) and compares favourably with published body mass distributions of independent glider faunas from Africa, Borneo and Australia. Expand
Locomotor performance and cost of transport in the northern flying squirrelGlaucomys sabrinus
TLDR
For glides of average length, cost of gliding was less than cost of quadrupedal locomotion except when the animals climbed to the launch point very slowly or ran quickly, so the hypothesis that gliding is less expensive than quadrupedAL locomotion is supported. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...