Sex differences in spinal excitability during observation of bipedal locomotion

@article{Cheng2007SexDI,
  title={Sex differences in spinal excitability during observation of bipedal locomotion},
  author={Yawei Cheng and Jean Decety and Ching-Po Lin and J. C. Hsieh and Daisy L. Hung and Ovid J. L. Tzeng},
  journal={NeuroReport},
  year={2007},
  volume={18},
  pages={887-890}
}
This study investigated whether there are sex differences in the spinal excitability of the human mirror–neuron system. We measured the modulation of spinal excitability, elicited by Hoffmann reflex in the left plantar flexor muscle (soleus), when women and men participants observed videos of bipedal heel-stepping (plantar dorsiflexion), standing still, and bipedal toe-stepping (plantar flexion). Men and women were similarly divided in their sex judgments of the observed legs. Our results… 
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