Sex at sea: alternative mating system in an extremely polygynous mammal

@article{Bruyn2011SexAS,
  title={Sex at sea: alternative mating system in an extremely polygynous mammal},
  author={Pjn de Bruyn and Cheryl Ann Tosh and M. N. Bester and E. Z. Cameron and Trevor McIntyre and Ian S. Wilkinson},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2011},
  volume={82},
  pages={445-451}
}
Financial support was provided by the South African Department of Science and Technology, through the National Research Foundation, in support of the Marine Mammal Programme of the MRI. 
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