Sex and virulence in Escherichia coli: an evolutionary perspective

@article{Wirth2006SexAV,
  title={Sex and virulence in Escherichia coli: an evolutionary perspective},
  author={Thierry Wirth and Daniel Falush and Ruiting Lan and Frances M. Colles and Patience A Mensa and Lothar H. Wieler and Helge Karch and Peter R Reeves and Martin C. J. Maiden and Howard Ochman and Mark Achtman},
  journal={Molecular Microbiology},
  year={2006},
  volume={60},
  pages={1136 - 1151}
}
Pathogenic Escherichia coli cause over 160 million cases of dysentery and one million deaths per year, whereas non‐pathogenic E. coli constitute part of the normal intestinal flora of healthy mammals and birds. The evolutionary pathways underlying this dichotomy in bacterial lifestyle were investigated by multilocus sequence typing of a global collection of isolates. Specific pathogen types [enterohaemorrhagic E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, enteroinvasive E. coli, K1 and Shigella] have… Expand
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