Sex and Deleterious Mutations

@article{Gordo2008SexAD,
  title={Sex and Deleterious Mutations},
  author={Isabel Gordo and Paulo R. A. Campos},
  journal={Genetics},
  year={2008},
  volume={179},
  pages={621 - 626}
}
The evolutionary advantage of sexual reproduction has been considered as one of the most pressing questions in evolutionary biology. While a pluralistic view of the evolution of sex and recombination has been suggested by some, here we take a simpler view and try to quantify the conditions under which sex can evolve given a set of minimal assumptions. Since real populations are finite and also subject to recurrent deleterious mutations, this minimal model should apply generally to all… 
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It is shown that the long- and short-term advantages of sex were both determined by differences between sexual and asexual populations in the evolutionary dynamics of two properties of the genetic architecture: the deleterious mutation rate (Ud) and recombination load (LR).
Rate of fixation of beneficial mutations in sexual populations.
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An overview of existing research on the evolutionary basis behind different reproductive modes is provided, with a focus on explaining the population genetic effects favouring low outcrossing rates in either partially selfing or asexual species.
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