Sex Differences in Aggression in Real-World Settings: A Meta-Analytic Review

@article{Archer2004SexDI,
  title={Sex Differences in Aggression in Real-World Settings: A Meta-Analytic Review},
  author={John Archer},
  journal={Review of General Psychology},
  year={2004},
  volume={8},
  pages={291 - 322}
}
  • J. Archer
  • Published 2004
  • Psychology
  • Review of General Psychology
Meta-analytic reviews of sex differences in aggression from real-world settings are described. They cover self-reports, observations, peer reports, and teacher reports of overall direct, physical, verbal, and indirect forms of aggression, as well as (for self-reports) trait anger. Findings are related to sexual selection theory and social role theory. Direct, especially physical, aggression was more common in males and females at all ages sampled, was consistent across cultures, and occurred… Expand

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