Corpus ID: 26958084

Severe hyperkalemia following ileostomy not colostomy in a patient undergoing chronic hemodialysis

@article{Yorimitsu2015SevereHF,
  title={Severe hyperkalemia following ileostomy not colostomy in a patient undergoing chronic hemodialysis},
  author={D. Yorimitsu and Tamaki Sasaki and H. Horike and Takaaki Fueki and Souhachi Fujimoto and N. Komai and M. Satoh and N. Kashihara},
  journal={Kawasaki medical journal},
  year={2015},
  volume={41},
  pages={65-69}
}
In patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the intestinal tract may assume an accessory potassium (K + ) excretory role in the face of declining renal excretory function. Here, we report the case of a patient with ESRD who developed severe hyperkalemia following ileostomy not colostomy. A 6△-year-old woman undergoing hemodialysis began developing severe hyperkalemia after ileostomy. Previously, she had successfully undergone resection and colostomy of the transverse colon. The pre… Expand

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