Severe chronic pain is associated with increased 10 year mortality. A cohort record linkage study

@article{Torrance2010SevereCP,
  title={Severe chronic pain is associated with increased 10 year mortality. A cohort record linkage study},
  author={N. Torrance and A. Elliott and A. Lee and Blair H. Smith},
  journal={European Journal of Pain},
  year={2010},
  volume={14}
}
Previous research has clearly demonstrated a link between chronic pain and poor health, and has suggested a link with increased mortality, though the latter is less consistent. In 1996 a cohort of 6940 individuals was recruited, and information collected, about reported chronic pain status, general health and socio‐demographic details. Ten years later, a record linkage was conducted between these data and the routinely collected national dataset for death registration. Primary cause of death… Expand

Paper Mentions

Interventional Clinical Trial
Pain is a symptom that drives hospital admissions, and pain management is required by most patients during their hospital stay. Further, the use of medications such as opioids can lead… Expand
ConditionsAcute Pain, Pain, Postoperative Pain
InterventionOther
Cause-specific mortality of patients with severe chronic pain referred to a multidisciplinary pain clinic: a cohort register-linkage study
TLDR
The overall mortality rate of patients with severe chronic pain in this study was six-fold higher than the rate of the general population in this region, and this was reflected in select specific causes of death (cancer and neoplasms, diseases of the circulatory system, Diseases of the respiratory system, and suicide). Expand
Mortality among persons experiencing musculoskeletal pain: a prospective study among Danish men and women
TLDR
Overall, persons experiencing MSK pain had a higher risk of mortality, including an increased cardiovascular mortality, persons with moderate pain and pain in two areas had an increased risk of cancer mortality, and persons with widespread pain had an increase risk of respiratory mortality. Expand
Chronic Pain and Mortality: A Systematic Review
TLDR
A mildly increased risk of death in people with chronic pain, particularly from cancer, was shown, however, the small number of studies and methodological differences prevented clear conclusions from being drawn. Expand
The relationship between back pain and mortality in older adults varies with disability and gender - results from the Cambridge over-75s Cohort
TLDR
It is shown that, among older adults, this association is specific to disabling pain and to women, and Clinicians should be aware not only of the short-term implications of disabling BP but also the longer-term effects. Expand
Mortality rate and causes of death in women with self-reported musculoskeletal pain: Results from a 17-year follow-up study
TLDR
The mortality rate was significantly higher for individuals with chronic pain compared to pain free individuals, adjusted for age and there was an increase in all-cause mortality. Expand
Chronic pain, opioid prescriptions, and mortality in Denmark: A population-based cohort study
TLDR
The risk of all‐cause mortality was significantly higher among long-term opioid users, but no obvious associations between long‐term opioid use and cause‐specific mortality were observed, however, opioid use increased the risk of injuries and toxicity/poisoning resulting in hospital inpatient admissions. Expand
Association of body pain and chronic disease: evidence from a 7-year population-based study in China
TLDR
Body pain is associated with major disease and mortality in the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study and future clinical research should be targeted to whether or not improved pain control can mitigate this population-level disease burden. Expand
Long-term mortality in older adults with chronic pain: a nationwide population-based study in Taiwan
TLDR
Chronic pain was associated with an increased rate of long-term mortality in the older population and early detection and intervention for treating CP are suggested for this population. Expand
Pain and mortality: mechanisms for a relationship
TLDR
Models of the relationship between troubling pain and mortality provide targets for preventive health programmes and interventions to improve general health, activity, and function could improve long-term survival in patients with this clinical problem. Expand
Inverse Association Between Neck Pain and All-Cause Mortality in Community-Dwelling Older Adults
TLDR
This study has confirmed the existence of an independent inverse association between neck pain and mortality in the elderly, suggesting that reduced sensitivity to neck pain may be a new marker of frailty. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 41 REFERENCES
Musculoskeletal pain is associated with a long-term increased risk of cancer and cardiovascular-related mortality
TLDR
This study supports a previous observation that persons with regional and widespread pain are at an increased risk of cancer death and suggests possible mechanisms should be explored. Expand
Is the report of widespread body pain associated with long-term increased mortality? Data from the Mini-Finland Health Survey.
TLDR
This study of multiple pains has not confirmed a previous observation of an association between the reporting of widespread pain and subsequent increased risk of cancer death, and differences in the definitions used or the population studied may account for the differences. Expand
Epidemiology of chronic pain in Denmark: An update
TLDR
The most recent Danish health survey of 2005 is based on a region‐stratified random sample of 10.916 individuals and the prevalence of chronic pain in Denmark has remained stable, but high, over a five-year period. Expand
Association of widespread body pain with an increased risk of cancer and reduced cancer survival: a prospective, population-based study.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that widespread pain reported in population surveys is associated with a substantial subsequent increased incidence of cancer and reduced cancer survival. Expand
Widespread body pain and mortality: prospective population based study.
TLDR
There is an intriguing association between the report of widespread pain and subsequent death from cancer in the medium and long term, and this may have implications for the long term follow up of patients with “unexplained” widespread pain symptoms, such as those with fibromyalgia. Expand
Pain and mortality risk among elderly persons in Sweden
TLDR
The finding that there are relationships between mortality risk and pain in the chest, abdomen, rectum, the extremities and head may be of clinical relevance, however, these results must be further investigated since the relationships between reported pain and mortality do not imply that pain in these locations is necessarily symptomatic of lethal diseases. Expand
Chronic musculoskeletal pain and depressive symptoms in the national health and nutrition examination I. Epidemiologic follow-up study
TLDR
Follow‐up data on subjects who were examined in two surveys conducted by the United States Center for Health Statistics at an interval of 8 years are reported, finding the strongest relationship found at the NHEFS between the variables examined was between chronic pain and depression. Expand
The epidemiology of chronic pain in the community
TLDR
Backward stepwise logistic-regression modelling identified age, sex, housing tenure, and employment status as significant predictors of the presence of chronic pain in the community. Expand
Persistent pain and well-being: a World Health Organization Study in Primary Care.
TLDR
Persistent pain was a commonly reported health problem among primary care patients and was consistently associated with psychological illness across centers, suggesting caution in drawing conclusions about the role of culture in shaping responses to persistent pain. Expand
The Chronic Pain Grade questionnaire: validation and reliability in postal research
TLDR
The Chronic Pain Grade questionnaire is a useful, reliable and valid measure of severity of chronic pain, which translates well into UK English and is acceptable in general population postal research. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...