Severe Aggression Among Female Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii at Gombe National Park, Tanzania

@article{Pusey2008SevereAA,
  title={Severe Aggression Among Female Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii at Gombe National Park, Tanzania},
  author={Anne E. Pusey and Carson M. Murray and William Wallauer and Michael Lawrence Wilson and Emily E. Wroblewski and Jane Goodall},
  journal={International Journal of Primatology},
  year={2008},
  volume={29},
  pages={949-973}
}
Aggression is generally more severe between males than between females because males gain greater payoffs from escalated aggression. Males that successfully defeat rivals may greatly increase their access to fertile females. Because female reproductive success depends on long-term access to resources, competition between females is often sustained but low key because no single interaction leads to a high payoff. Nonetheless, escalated aggression can sometimes immediately improve a female’s… 
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