Seven evolutionarily conserved human rhodopsin G protein‐coupled receptors lacking close relatives

@article{Fredriksson2003SevenEC,
  title={Seven evolutionarily conserved human rhodopsin G protein‐coupled receptors lacking close relatives},
  author={R. Fredriksson and P{\"a}r J. H{\"o}glund and D. Gloriam and M. Lagerstr{\"o}m and H. Schi{\"o}th},
  journal={FEBS Letters},
  year={2003},
  volume={554}
}
We report seven new members of the superfamily of human G protein‐coupled receptors (GPCRs) found by searches in the human genome databases, termed GPR100, GPR119, GPR120, GPR135, GPR136, GPR141, and GPR142. We also report 16 orthologues of these receptors in mouse, rat, fugu (pufferfish) and zebrafish. Phylogenetic analysis shows that these are additional members of the family of rhodopsin‐type GPCRs. GPR100 shows similarity with the orphan receptor SALPR. Remarkably, the other receptors do… Expand
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