Settler Skills and Colonial Development: The Huguenot Wine‐Makers in Eighteenth‐Century Dutch South Africa

@article{Fourie2014SettlerSA,
  title={Settler Skills and Colonial Development: The Huguenot Wine‐Makers in Eighteenth‐Century Dutch South Africa},
  author={Johan Fourie and Dieter von Fintel},
  journal={History of Economics eJournal},
  year={2014}
}
type="main"> The institutional literature emphasizes local conditions in explaining divergent colonial development. We posit that this view can be enriched by an important supply-side cause: the skills with which the settlers arrive. The Huguenots who arrived at the Cape Colony in 1688/9, we argue, possessed skills different from those of the incumbent farmers, and this enabled them to become more productive wine-makers. We demonstrate this by showing that this difference is explained by none… Expand
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