Setting number of decimal places for reporting risk ratios: rule of four

@article{Cole2015SettingNO,
  title={Setting number of decimal places for reporting risk ratios: rule of four},
  author={Tim James Cole},
  journal={BMJ : British Medical Journal},
  year={2015},
  volume={350}
}
  • T. Cole
  • Published 27 April 2015
  • Business, Medicine
  • BMJ : British Medical Journal
Summary statistics are often reported to too many or, less often, too few decimal places. The rule of four provides a simple framework to guide authors in the appropriate number of decimal places to use when reporting risk ratios 
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  • T. Cole
  • Education
    Archives of Disease in Childhood
  • 2015
TLDR
It concerns me that numbers are often reported to excessive precision, because too many digits can swamp the reader, overcomplicate the story and obscure the message.
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