Setting free the bears: escape from thought suppression.

@article{Wegner2011SettingFT,
  title={Setting free the bears: escape from thought suppression.},
  author={D. Wegner},
  journal={The American psychologist},
  year={2011},
  volume={66 8},
  pages={
          671-80
        }
}
  • D. Wegner
  • Published 2011
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The American psychologist
A person who is asked to think aloud while trying not to think about a white bear will typically mention the bear once a minute. So how can people suppress unwanted thoughts? This article examines a series of indirect thought suppression techniques and therapies that have been explored for their efficacy as remedies for unwanted thoughts of all kinds and that offer some potential as means for effective suppression. The strategies that have some promise include focused distraction, stress and… Expand

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