Serum uric acid and multiple sclerosis

@article{Rentzos2006SerumUA,
  title={Serum uric acid and multiple sclerosis},
  author={Michael Rentzos and Chryssoula Nikolaou and Maria C Anagnostouli and Antonis Rombos and K. Tsakanikas and Manolis Economou and Antonis Dimitrakopoulos and M. Karouli and Demetrios Vassilopoulos},
  journal={Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery},
  year={2006},
  volume={108},
  pages={527-531}
}

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...

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Serum uric acid and multiple sclerosis

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The view that reduced UA in MS is a primary, constitutive loss of protection against oxidative agents, which deserves further pathogenetic elucidation aimed at future therapeutic strategies is favors the view.

Uric acid levels in sera from patients with multiple sclerosis

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It is suggested that serum UA might serve as a possible marker of disease activity in MS and provide support to the potential beneficial therapeutic effect of radical-scavenging substances in MS.

Increase in serum levels of uric acid, an endogenous antioxidant, under treatment with glatiramer acetate for multiple sclerosis

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Investigating serum UA changes during open-label treatment of relapsing MS with GAA found increasing UA, a natural inhibitor of free radicals, may represent a mechanism of action of glatiramer acetate in MS.

Inactivation of peroxynitrite in multiple sclerosis patients after oral administration of inosine may suggest possible approaches to therapy of the disease

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Serum UA levels are raised and maintained at elevated levels for a year and more without reported side-effects by oral administration of its precursor inosine, providing evidence that serum UA levels can be readily manipulated.

Serum uric acid levels in multiple sclerosis patients correlate with activity of disease and blood–brain barrier dysfunction

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Investigation of relationships of uric acid serum levels in relapse–remitting MS patients with clinical activity of disease and blood–brain barrier condition indicates that lowerUric acid levels in MS patients are associated with relapse and suggest that uric Acid might be beneficial in the treatment of MS.

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This study does not justify a recommendation for use of inosine in MS patients yet, but the current knowledge of uric acid and MS supports hypotheses which predict a positive effect of radical scavengers in MS.

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Serum uric acid levels before and after high-dose methylprednisolone treatment (intravenous 1 g/day/5 days) in multiple sclerosis patients are investigated to suggest that increasing the uric Acid concentration may represent one of the possible mechanisms of action of methylpredisonsolone inmultiple sclerosis.

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Reduced antioxidant reserve is possibly an early patho genic mechanism in inflammatory demyelination, and raises the possibility that low uric acid levels could be an indicator of disease activity, since optic neuropathies of other causes were not investigated.

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Uric acid treatment was found to have strong therapeutic effects in a dose-dependent fashion and diminish clinical signs of a disease resembling EAE in interferon-gamma receptor knockout mice, raising the possibility that hyperuricemia may protect against MS.

Uric acid, a peroxynitrite scavenger, inhibits CNS inflammation, blood–CNS barrier permeability changes, and tissue damage in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis

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TLDR
It is shown that if administered to mice before the onset of clinical EAE, UA interferes with the invasion of inflammatory cells into the CNS and prevents development of the disease and suppresses the enhanced blood‐CNS barrier permeability characteristic of EAE.