Serum Lutein Response Is Greater from Free Lutein Than from Esterified Lutein during 4 Weeks of Supplementation in Healthy Adults

@article{Norkus2010SerumLR,
  title={Serum Lutein Response Is Greater from Free Lutein Than from Esterified Lutein during 4 Weeks of Supplementation in Healthy Adults},
  author={Edward P. Norkus and Katherine L Norkus and T. S. Dharmarajan and Joseph Schierle and Wolfgang Schalch},
  journal={Journal of the American College of Nutrition},
  year={2010},
  volume={29},
  pages={575 - 585}
}
Background: Current data suggest great variability in serum response following lutein ingestion from various sources. Objective: To compare the relative serum response during supplementation with free lutein (fL) and lutein esters (Le). Methods: 72 volunteers (23–52 years; body mass index [BMI] >20 and <30 kg/m2; baseline serum lutein <20 µg/dL [<352 nmol/L]) were identified. Subjects, matched for gender, age, and BMI, were randomly assigned to the fL or Le group. fL and Le capsules contained… Expand
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