Sequential dependencies in the Eriksen flanker task: A direct comparison of two competing accounts

@article{Davelaar2009SequentialDI,
  title={Sequential dependencies in the Eriksen flanker task: A direct comparison of two competing accounts},
  author={E. Davelaar and Jennifer A. Stevens},
  journal={Psychonomic Bulletin \& Review},
  year={2009},
  volume={16},
  pages={121-126}
}
In the conflict/control loop theory proposed by Botvinick, Braver, Barch, Carter, and Cohen (2001), conflict monitored in a trial leads to an increase in cognitive control on the subsequent trial. The critical data pattern supporting this assertion is the so-called Gratton effect—the decrease in flanker interference following incongruent trials—which was initially observed in the Eriksen flanker task. Recently, however, the validity of the idea that this pattern supports a general conflict… Expand
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