Sequencing and Analysis of Neanderthal Genomic DNA

@article{Noonan2006SequencingAA,
  title={Sequencing and Analysis of Neanderthal Genomic DNA},
  author={James P. Noonan and Graham M. Coop and Sridhar Kudaravalli and Douglas Smith and Johannes Krause and Joseph Alessi and Feng Chen and Darren Platt and Svante P{\"a}{\"a}bo and Jonathan K. Pritchard and Edward M. Rubin},
  journal={Science},
  year={2006},
  volume={314},
  pages={1113 - 1118}
}
Our knowledge of Neanderthals is based on a limited number of remains and artifacts from which we must make inferences about their biology, behavior, and relationship to ourselves. Here, we describe the characterization of these extinct hominids from a new perspective, based on the development of a Neanderthal metagenomic library and its high-throughput sequencing and analysis. Several lines of evidence indicate that the 65,250 base pairs of hominid sequence so far identified in the library are… 
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