Septoria nodorum blotch of wheat: disease management and resistance breeding in the face of shifting disease dynamics and a changing environment.

@article{Downie2020SeptoriaNB,
  title={Septoria nodorum blotch of wheat: disease management and resistance breeding in the face of shifting disease dynamics and a changing environment.},
  author={Rowena C. Downie and Minli Lin and Beatrice Corsi and Andrea Ficke and Morten Lillemo and Richard P. Oliver and Huyen T. T. Phan and Kar-Chun Tan and James Cockram},
  journal={Phytopathology},
  year={2020}
}
The fungus Parastagonospora nodorum is a narrow host range necrotrophic fungal pathogen that causes Septoria nodorum blotch (SNB) of cereals, most notably wheat. Although commonly observed on wheat seedlings, P. nodorum infection has the greatest effect on the adult crop. It results in leaf blotch, which limits photosynthesis and thus crop growth and yield. It can also affect the wheat ear, resulting in glume blotch which directly affects grain quality. Reports of P. nodorum fungicide… Expand
2 Citations
Hidden in plain sight: a molecular field survey of three wheat leaf blotch fungal diseases in North-Western Europe shows co-infection is widespread
TLDR
The study highlights that the occurrence of mixed infection is common and widespread, with important implications for wheat disease management and breeding strategies, and uses quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays specific for each pathogen. Expand
Monitoring of Natural Occurrence and Severity of Leaf and Glume Blotch Diseases of Winter Wheat and Winter Triticale Incited by Necrotrophic Fungi Parastagonospora spp. and Zymoseptoria tritici
TLDR
The most significant winter wheat pathogen showed to be Z. tritici, while on winter triticale P. nodorum incited disease symptoms on the largest number of leaves, and the relationship between late-season and early-season factors associated with temperature and precipitation on the severity of diseases incited by the pathogens was statistically significant. Expand