Separating the post-Glacial coancestry of European and Asian Y chromosomes within haplogroup R1a

@article{Underhill2010SeparatingTP,
  title={Separating the post-Glacial coancestry of European and Asian Y chromosomes within haplogroup R1a},
  author={Peter A. Underhill and Natalie M. Myres and Siiri Rootsi and Mait Metspalu and Lev A. Zhivotovsky and Roy J. King and Alice A. Lin and C‐E. T. Chow and Ornella Semino and Vincenza Battaglia and Ildus Kutuev and Mari J{\"a}rve and Gyaneshwer Chaubey and Qasim Ayub and Aisha Mohyuddin and Syed Qasim Mehdi and Sanghamitra Sengupta and Evgeny I. Rogaev and Elza K. Khusnutdinova and Andrey Pshenichnov and Oleg P. Balanovsky and Elena V. Balanovska and Nina Jeran and Dubravka Hava{\vs} Augu{\vs}tin and Mari{\'a}n Baldovi{\vc} and Rene J Herrera and Kumarasamy Thangaraj and Vijay Singh and Lalji Singh and Partha P. Majumder and Pavao Rudan and Dragan Primorac and Richard Villems and Toomas Kivisild},
  journal={European Journal of Human Genetics},
  year={2010},
  volume={18},
  pages={479-484}
}
Human Y-chromosome haplogroup structure is largely circumscribed by continental boundaries. One notable exception to this general pattern is the young haplogroup R1a that exhibits post-Glacial coalescent times and relates the paternal ancestry of more than 10% of men in a wide geographic area extending from South Asia to Central East Europe and South Siberia. Its origin and dispersal patterns are poorly understood as no marker has yet been described that would distinguish European R1a… 
A major Y-chromosome haplogroup R1b Holocene era founder effect in Central and Western Europe
TLDR
Within the M412 dichotomy, the major S116 sub-clade shows a frequency peak in the upper Danube basin and Paris area with declining frequency toward Italy, Iberia, Southern France and British Isles, and more complex pre-Neolithic scenarios remain possible for the L23(xM412) components in Southeast Europe and elsewhere.
Extended Y chromosome investigation suggests postglacial migrations of modern humans into East Asia via the northern route.
TLDR
It is proposed that although the Paleolithic migrations via the southern route played a major role in modern human settlement in East Asia, there are ancient contributions, though limited, from THE AUTHORS, which partly explain the genetic divergence between current southern and northern East Asian populations.
Subdividing Y-chromosome haplogroup R1a1 reveals Norse Viking dispersal lineages in Britain
TLDR
Comparison of modern DNA with recently available ancient DNA data supports the interpretation that two sub-lineages of hg R1a1 spread with the Vikings from peninsular Scandinavia.
Mitochondrial DNA signals of late glacial recolonization of Europe from near eastern refugia.
Sousse: extreme genetic heterogeneity in North Africa
TLDR
Principal component analysis based on haplogroup frequencies, multidimensional scaling based on Rst genetic distances and analyses of molecular variance using both Y-chromosome short tandem repeat haplotypes and Y-SNP haplogroups revealed that the Tunisian and North African groups are intra- and inter-specific diverse with Sousse being highly heterogeneous.
Y-Chromosome Diversity in Modern Bulgarians: New Clues about Their Ancestry
TLDR
The data suggest that a common paternal ancestry between the proto-Bulgarians and the Altaic and Central Asian Turkic-speaking populations either did not exist or was negligible.
Exploring the Y Chromosomal Ancestry of Modern Panamanians
TLDR
The findings reveal a local evolution of the male Native American ancestral gene pool, and a strong but geographically differentiated unidirectional sex bias in the formation of local modern Panamanian populations.
Phylogenetic applications of whole Y-chromosome sequences and the Near Eastern origin of Ashkenazi Levites
TLDR
The analysis of 16 whole R1 sequences shows that a set of 19 unique nucleotide substitutions defines the Ashkenazi R1a lineage, indicative of a geographic source of the Levite founder lineage in the Near East and its likely presence among pre-Diaspora Hebrews.
Population Differentiation of Southern Indian Male Lineages Correlates with Agricultural Expansions Predating the Caste System
TLDR
The utility of detailed local genetic studies within India, without prior assumptions about the importance of Varna rank status for population grouping, is highlighted to obtain new insights into the relative influences of past demographic events for the population structure of the whole of modern India.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 63 REFERENCES
Polarity and temporality of high-resolution y-chromosome distributions in India identify both indigenous and exogenous expansions and reveal minor genetic influence of Central Asian pastoralists.
TLDR
The reappraisal indicates that pre-Holocene and Holocene-era--not Indo-European--expansions have shaped the distinctive South Asian Y-chromosome landscape.
High-resolution phylogenetic analysis of southeastern Europe traces major episodes of paternal gene flow among Slavic populations.
TLDR
The extent and nature of southeastern Europe (SEE) paternal genetic contribution to the European genetic landscape were explored based on a high-resolution Y chromosome analysis involving 681 males from seven populations in the region, finding that five major haplogroups comprise more than 70% of SEE total genetic variation.
A prehistory of Indian Y chromosomes: evaluating demic diffusion scenarios.
TLDR
The Y-chromosomal data consistently suggest a largely South Asian origin for Indian caste communities and therefore argue against any major influx, from regions north and west of India, of people associated either with the development of agriculture or the spread of the Indo-Aryan language family.
High-resolution analysis of human Y-chromosome variation shows a sharp discontinuity and limited gene flow between northwestern Africa and the Iberian Peninsula.
TLDR
The most striking results are that contemporary NW African and Iberian populations were found to have originated from distinctly different patrilineages and that the Strait of Gibraltar seems to have acted as a strong (although not complete) barrier to gene flow.
Paternal population history of East Asia: sources, patterns, and microevolutionary processes.
TLDR
The peopling of East Asia was more complex than earlier models had proposed-that is, a multilayered, multidirectional, and multidisciplinary framework is necessary.
High Levels of Y-Chromosome Differentiation among Native Siberian Populations and the Genetic Signature of a Boreal Hunter-Gatherer Way of Life
TLDR
The Siberian pattern of reduced haplogroup diversity within populations combined with high levels of differentiation among populations may be a general feature characteristic of indigenous groups that have small effective population sizes and that have been isolated for long periods of time.
Evolution and migration history of the Chinese population inferred from Chinese Y-chromosome evidence
TLDR
A West/North-origin hypothesis is tentatively proposed, suggesting that haplogroup O originated in West/ North China and mainly evolved in China and thence spread further throughout eastern Eurasia.
The Himalayas as a directional barrier to gene flow.
TLDR
The results suggest that the Tibetans and Nepalese are in part descendants of Tibeto-Burman-speaking groups originating from Northeast Asia and indicate gene flow from the Indian subcontinent and, in the case of haplogroup R, from Eurasia as well.
Iran: Tricontinental Nexus for Y-Chromosome Driven Migration
TLDR
The study of high-resolution Y-chromosome genotyping allowed for an in-depth analysis unattained in previous studies of the area, revealing important migratory and demographic events that shaped the contemporary genetic landscape.
...
...