Separating the Brain Regions Involved in Recollection and Familiarity in Recognition Memory

@article{Yonelinas2005SeparatingTB,
  title={Separating the Brain Regions Involved in Recollection and Familiarity in Recognition Memory},
  author={Andrew P. Yonelinas and Leun J. Otten and Kendra N. Shaw and Michael D. Rugg},
  journal={The Journal of Neuroscience},
  year={2005},
  volume={25},
  pages={3002 - 3008}
}
The neural substrates of recognition memory retrieval were examined in a functional magnetic resonance imaging study designed to separate activity related to recollection from that related to continuous variations in familiarity. Across a variety of brain regions, the neural signature of recollection was found to be distinct from familiarity, demonstrating that recollection cannot be attributed to familiarity strength. In the prefrontal cortex, an anterior medial region was related to… 

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TLDR
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