Separate and Unequal in the Labor Market : Human Capital and the Jim Crow Wage Gap

@inproceedings{Carruthers2014SeparateAU,
  title={Separate and Unequal in the Labor Market : Human Capital and the Jim Crow Wage Gap},
  author={Celeste K. Carruthers and Marianne H. Wanamaker},
  year={2014}
}
  • Celeste K. Carruthers, Marianne H. Wanamaker
  • Published 2014
The gap between black and white earnings is a longstanding feature of the United States labor market. Competing explanations attribute different weight to wage discrimination and access to human capital. Using new data on local school quality, we find that human capital played a predominant role in determining 1940 wage and occupational status gaps in the South despite the effective disenfranchisement of blacks, entrenched racial discrimination in civic life, and lack of federal employment… CONTINUE READING

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