Separate Neural Systems Value Immediate and Delayed Monetary Rewards

@article{McClure2004SeparateNS,
  title={Separate Neural Systems Value Immediate and Delayed Monetary Rewards},
  author={Samuel M. McClure and David I. Laibson and George Loewenstein and Jonathan D. Cohen},
  journal={Science},
  year={2004},
  volume={306},
  pages={503 - 507}
}
When humans are offered the choice between rewards available at different points in time, the relative values of the options are discounted according to their expected delays until delivery. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examined the neural correlates of time discounting while subjects made a series of choices between monetary reward options that varied by delay to delivery. We demonstrate that two separate systems are involved in such decisions. Parts of the limbic system… 
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