Sentient Beings and Wildlife Resources: Inuit, Beluga Whales and Management Regimes in the Canadian Arctic

@article{Tyrrell2007SentientBA,
  title={Sentient Beings and Wildlife Resources: Inuit, Beluga Whales and Management Regimes in the Canadian Arctic},
  author={Martina Tyrrell},
  journal={Human Ecology},
  year={2007},
  volume={35},
  pages={575-586}
}
  • M. Tyrrell
  • Published 30 January 2007
  • Environmental Science
  • Human Ecology
Beluga whale hunting is one of the most social subsistence hunting activities to take place in the Canadian Arctic. Through the harvest, distribution and consumption of beluga whales, Inuit identity and social relationships are affirmed. The whale-hunting complex is influenced by beliefs that beluga whales are sentient beings who inhabit a shared social space with humans. Yet, across the region beluga whales are perceived by wildlife managers as scarce resources and as such require protection… 

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Tyrrell (2007) examined beluga hunting and management in northern Quebec (Nunavik), but has made several errors in her use of the available information. First, the western Hudson Bay beluga

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