Sensory receptors in monotremes.

@article{Proske1998SensoryRI,
  title={Sensory receptors in monotremes.},
  author={Uwe Proske and J. E. Gregory and Ainsley Iggo},
  journal={Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences},
  year={1998},
  volume={353 1372},
  pages={
          1187-98
        }
}
  • U. Proske, J. Gregory, A. Iggo
  • Published 29 July 1998
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences
This is a summary of the current knowledge of sensory receptors in skin of the bill of the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, and the snout of the echidna, Tachyglossus aculeatus. Brief mention is also made of the third living member of the monotremes, the long-nosed echidna, Zaglossus bruijnii. The monotremes are the only group of mammals known to have evolved electroreception. The structures in the skin responsible for the electric sense have been identified as sensory mucous glands with an… 
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The similar appearance of the dorsal thalamus in the two species until the time of hatching, followed by the rapid expansion of the VP in the platypus, is most consistent with ancestral platypuses having undergone changes in the genetic control of thalamic neurogenesis to produce a large VP for trigeminal electroreception after the divergence of the two lineages of monotreme.
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References

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Studies of mechanoreceptors in skin of the snout of the echidna Tachyglossus aculeatus.
TLDR
It is concluded that mechanoreceptor responses in the echidna's snout skin resemble those in other mammals in many aspects, although it could not unequivocally associate responses to mechanical stimulation with the push rods.
Responses of electroreceptors in the snout of the echidna.
TLDR
The echidna, like the other Australian representative of the monotremes, the platypus, has an electric sense, and it remains to be determined what kinds of sources of electric fields the animal encounters in its normal habitat.
Ultrastructure, number, distribution and innervation of electroreceptors and mechanoreceptors in the bill skin of the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus.
TLDR
The innervation of the bill by the trigeminal nerve is described, as are three sensory structures, associated with food gathering, within the bill skin, which suggest a basis for the ability of the platypus to quickly and accurately locate the origin of an electrical stimulus.
Electroreceptors in the platypus
TLDR
Direct electrophysiological evidence is presented for the existence of electroreceptors in the bill of the platypus, which has been known since the last century that the bill contains densely packed arrays of specialized receptor organs and their afferent nerves.
Receptors in the bill of the platypus.
TLDR
The presence of electroreceptors of a unique structure and supplied by the trigeminal nerve indicates that electroreception has evolved independently in monotremes, adding support to the claim that platypuses are able to detect moving prey by the electrical activity associated with muscle contraction.
Electroreception and the Feeding Behaviour of Platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus: Monotremata: Mammalia)
TLDR
It is demonstrated for the first time that platypus are indeed sensitive to electrical waveforms that imitate the electromyogenic potential’s of fleeing prey, and following stimulation show interest in area surrounding the electrodes.
Cutaneous electroreceptors in the platypus: a new mammalian receptor.
TLDR
A new mammalian receptor known as Cutaneous electroreceptors in the platypus is talked about, which would presumably facilitate the detection of small changes in the potential field surrounding the animal, and enable the receptor to signal both increases and decreases of field strength.
Responses of electroreceptors in the platypus bill to steady and alternating potentials.
1. This is a report of further observations on the response characteristics of electroreceptors in the bill of the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, first described by Gregory, Iggo, McIntyre &
Nerve terminals of mucous gland electroreceptors in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus)
TLDR
This study demonstrates the portions of the nerve terminals responsible for electroreception, and shows how these portions use the surrounding epidermal tissue to overcome the combined problems of lacking a sensory cell and making physical contact with the conducting medium in the duct of the gland.
Ultrastructure and distribution of epidermal sensory receptors in the beak of the echidna, Tachyglossus aculeatus.
Within the rostral one centimetre of the Echidna beak, three specialised receptors were found: a mucous sensory gland, a rod-like structure, and an innervated epidermal pit. The mucous sensory gland
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