Sensory exploitation and the evolution of male mating behaviour: a cladistic test using water mites (Acari: Parasitengona)

@article{Proctor1992SensoryEA,
  title={Sensory exploitation and the evolution of male mating behaviour: a cladistic test using water mites (Acari: Parasitengona)},
  author={H. Proctor},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1992},
  volume={44},
  pages={745-752}
}
  • H. Proctor
  • Published 1992
  • Biology
  • Animal Behaviour
  • Abstract The sensory exploitation hypothesis explains male secondary sexual characters as adaptations to exploit female responses that evolved in non-sexual contexts. The water mite Neumania papillator takes up a characteristic posture, the net-stance, in order to detect vibrations produced by copepod prey. Courting males vibrate their legs (‘male courtship trembling’) near females, and previous research shows that females respond to the vibrations as if they were produced by prey. The sensory… CONTINUE READING
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