Sensory ability in the narwhal tooth organ system

@article{Nweeia2014SensoryAI,
  title={Sensory ability in the narwhal tooth organ system},
  author={Martin T. Nweeia and Frederick C. Eichmiller and Peter V. Hauschka and Gretchen A. Donahue and Jack R. Orr and Steven H. Ferguson and Cortney A. Watt and James G. Mead and Charles W. Potter and Rune Dietz and Anthony A M Giuseppetti and Sandie R. Black and Alexander J. Trachtenberg and Winston Patrick Kuo},
  journal={The Anatomical Record},
  year={2014},
  volume={297}
}
The erupted tusk of the narwhal exhibits sensory ability. The hypothesized sensory pathway begins with ocean water entering through cementum channels to a network of patent dentinal tubules extending from the dentinocementum junction to the inner pulpal wall. Circumpulpal sensory structures then signal pulpal nerves terminating near the base of the tusk. The maxillary division of the fifth cranial nerve then transmits this sensory information to the brain. This sensory pathway was first… 
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