Sensory Bias and the Adaptiveness of Female Choice

@article{Dawkins1996SensoryBA,
  title={Sensory Bias and the Adaptiveness of Female Choice},
  author={Marian Stamp Dawkins and Tim Guilford},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={1996},
  volume={148},
  pages={937 - 942}
}
Theories of the evolution of female choice are commonly divided (Bradbury and Andersson 1987; Hill 1994; Pomiankowski 1994) into those that are described as adaptive (e.g., the female gains "good genes" as a result of choosing one male rather than another) and those that are described as nonadaptive or arbitrary. Into the "adaptive" category go theories of honest advertisement ofmale quality because females are held to pass on genetic benefits to both their male and their female offspring by… Expand
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