Sensitization and desensitization to capsaicin and menthol in the oral cavity: Interactions and individual differences

@article{Cliff1996SensitizationAD,
  title={Sensitization and desensitization to capsaicin and menthol in the oral cavity: Interactions and individual differences},
  author={Margaret A Cliff and Barry G Green},
  journal={Physiology \& Behavior},
  year={1996},
  volume={59},
  pages={487-494}
}
It was reported in a recent study that, like capsaicin, menthol is capable of producing a desensitization to sensory irritation in the oral cavity. Whereas capsaicin is known to be able to cross-desensitize with other chemical irritants, no such information exists for menthol. To address this question, the first experiment was designed to reveal whether cross-desensitization would occur between menthol and capsaicin. After a pretest on the tongue tip in which subjects rated the intensity of… 
The Generalizability of Capsaicin Sensitization and Desensitization
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TLDR
There is no evidence for sensitization occurring during normal food consumption under conditions in which the rate of consumption was timed, as in Experiment 1, or was self-paced, and substantial individual variability in response patterns was again apparent.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
The consumption of foods containing capsaicin and menthol significantly alters thermal sensory thresholds in the oral cavity, and dietary habits should be taken into account when intra-oral thermal thresholds are determined.
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TLDR
The contribution of amiloride-sensitive ionic currents or the Na+/H+ exchange pump (NHE) are suggested as possible transduction mechanisms in lingual nociceptors mediating NaCl-evoked oral irritation.
Assessing regional sensitivity and desensitization to capsaicin among oral cavity mucosae.
TLDR
Based on differences in sensitivity and the extent of desensitization among these areas, these results indicate oral cavity mucosae respond to, but are impacted differently by, capsaicin exposure.
Rapid recovery from capsaicin desensitization during recurrent stimulation
TLDR
It is demonstrated that desensitization of the tongue produced by either capsaicin or piperine can be temporarily reversed if stimulation with either chemical is resumed for only a few minutes.
Taste suppression following lingual capsaicin pre-treatment in humans.
TLDR
The results indicate that oral capsaicin reduces certain but not all taste sensations and are discussed in terms of possible physiological and cognitive interactions.
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