Sensitivity of a coupled climate-carbon cycle model to large volcanic eruptions during the last millennium

@article{Brovkin2010SensitivityOA,
  title={Sensitivity of a coupled climate-carbon cycle model to large volcanic eruptions during the last millennium},
  author={Victor A. Brovkin and Stephan Loren and Johann H. Jungclaus and Thomas J{\"u}rgen Raddatz and Claudia Timmreck and Christian Reick and Joachim Segschneider and Katharina D. Six},
  journal={Tellus B: Chemical and Physical Meteorology},
  year={2010},
  volume={62},
  pages={674 - 681}
}
The sensitivity of the climate–biogeochemistry system to volcanic eruptions is investigated using the comprehensive Earth System Model developed at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology. The model includes an interactive carbon cycle with modules for terrestrial biosphere as well as ocean biogeochemistry. The volcanic forcing is based on a recent reconstruction for the last 1200 yr. An ensemble of five simulations is performed and the averaged response of the system is analysed in particular… 

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