Sensing of 'danger signals' and pathogen-associated molecular patterns defines binary signaling pathways 'upstream' of Toll

Abstract

In drosophila, molecular determinants from fungi and Gram-positive bacteria are detected by circulating pattern-recognition receptors. Published findings suggest that such pattern-recognition receptors activate as-yet-unidentified serine-protease cascades that culminate in the cleavage of Spätzle, the endogenous Toll receptor ligand, and trigger the immune response. We demonstrate here that the protease Grass defines a common activation cascade for the detection of fungi and Gram-positive bacteria mediated by pattern-recognition receptors. The serine protease Persephone, shown before to be specific for fungal detection in a cascade activated by secreted fungal proteases, was also required for the sensing of proteases elicited by bacteria in the hemolymph. Hence, Persephone defines a parallel proteolytic cascade activated by 'danger signals' such as abnormal proteolytic activities.

DOI: 10.1038/ni.1643

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@article{Chamy2008SensingO, title={Sensing of 'danger signals' and pathogen-associated molecular patterns defines binary signaling pathways 'upstream' of Toll}, author={Laure El Chamy and Vincent Leclerc and Isabelle Caldelari and J Reichhart}, journal={Nature Immunology}, year={2008}, volume={9}, pages={1165-1170} }