Sennacherib, Archimedes, and the Water Screw: The Context of Invention in the Ancient World

@article{Dalley2003SennacheribAA,
  title={Sennacherib, Archimedes, and the Water Screw: The Context of Invention in the Ancient World},
  author={S. Dalley and Stephanie John Peter Oleson},
  journal={Technology and Culture},
  year={2003},
  volume={44},
  pages={1 - 26}
}
  • S. Dalley, Stephanie John Peter Oleson
  • Published 2003
  • Engineering
  • Technology and Culture
  • Invention of the water screw is traditionally credited to the third-century B.C. Greek scientist-engineer Archimedes, on the basis of numerous Greek and Latin texts and the technological context of Hellenistic Alexandria. An Assyrian text from the seventh century B.C. may be interpreted to show that king Sennacherib cast such a device in bronze at Nineveh, for use in his palace garden. Such an argument may be strengthened by comparison with details of Assyrian technical capabilities in large… CONTINUE READING
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