Senescent birds redouble reproductive effort when ill: confirmation of the terminal investment hypothesis

@article{Velando2006SenescentBR,
  title={Senescent birds redouble reproductive effort when ill: confirmation of the terminal investment hypothesis},
  author={Alberto Velando and Hugh Drummond and Roxana Torres},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2006},
  volume={273},
  pages={1443 - 1448}
}
This study reports an experimental confirmation of the terminal investment hypothesis, a longstanding theoretical idea that animals should increase their reproductive effort as they age and their prospects for survival and reproduction decline. Previous correlational and experimental attempts to test this hypothesis have yielded contradictory results. In the blue-footed booby, Sula nebouxii, a long-lived bird, after initial increase, male reproductive success declines progressively with age… 

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