Semifree-ranging Tufted Capuchins (Cebus apella) Spontaneously Use Tools to Crack Open Nuts

@article{Ottoni2004SemifreerangingTC,
  title={Semifree-ranging Tufted Capuchins (Cebus apella) Spontaneously Use Tools to Crack Open Nuts},
  author={Eduardo B. Ottoni and Massimo Mannu},
  journal={International Journal of Primatology},
  year={2004},
  volume={22},
  pages={347-358}
}
Naturalistic studies on tool use by nonhuman primates have focused almost exclusively on Old World monkeys or hominoids. We studied the cracking of Syagrus nuts with the aid of stones by a group of semifree-ranging capuchins living in a reforested area (Tietê Ecological Park, São Paulo, Brazil). Our data are from direct observation and from mapping nut-cracking site utilization. All adults, subadults and juveniles (plus one infant) crack nuts, but individual differences in frequency and… Expand

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