Semantic Processing in the Left Inferior Prefrontal Cortex: A Combined Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study

@article{Devlin2003SemanticPI,
  title={Semantic Processing in the Left Inferior Prefrontal Cortex: A Combined Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study},
  author={Joseph T. Devlin and Paul M. Matthews and Matthew F. S. Rushworth},
  journal={Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience},
  year={2003},
  volume={15},
  pages={71-84}
}
The involvement of the left inferior prefrontal cortex (LIPC) in phonological processing is well established from both lesion-deficit studies with neurological patients and functional neuroimaging studies of normals. Its involvement in semantic processing, on the other hand, is less clear. Although many imaging studies have demonstrated LIPC activation during semantic tasks, this may be due to implicit phonological processing. This article presents two experiments investigating semantic… 
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The Inferior Frontal Gyrus and Phonological Processing: An Investigation using rTMS
TLDR
It is concluded that the opercular region of the IFG is necessary for the normal operation of phonologically based working memory mechanisms and shown that rTMS can shed further light on the precise role of cortical language areas in humans.
Effects of Left Inferior Prefrontal Stimulation on Episodic Memory Formation: A Two-Stage fMRIrTMS Study
TLDR
It is suggested that LIPFC stimulation may have produced its effect on recognition memory, at least in part, through the triggering of more extensive processing of the stimulated items and an ensuing gain in item distinctiveness.
An event-related fMRI investigation of phonological versus semantic short-term memory
Abstract Studies with normal and brain damaged subjects have indicated that there are semantic as well as phonological contributions to verbal short-term memory. An event-related functional MRI study
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