Selfish genetic elements

@article{gren2018SelfishGE,
  title={Selfish genetic elements},
  author={J. Arvid {\AA}gren and Andrew G. Clark},
  journal={PLoS Genetics},
  year={2018},
  volume={14}
}
Selfish genetic elements (historically also referred to as selfish genes, ultra-selfish genes, selfish DNA, parasitic DNA, genomic outlaws) are genetic segments that can enhance their own transmission at the expense of other genes in the genome, even if this has no or a negative effect on organismal fitness. [1–6] Genomes have traditionally been viewed as cohesive units, with genes acting together to improve the fitness of the organism. However, when genes have some control over their own… 

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