Selfish genes, the phenotype paradigm and genome evolution

@article{Doolittle1980SelfishGT,
  title={Selfish genes, the phenotype paradigm and genome evolution},
  author={W. Doolittle and C. Sapienza},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1980},
  volume={284},
  pages={601-603}
}
Natural selection operating within genomes will inevitably result in the appearance of DNAs with no phenotypic expression whose only ‘function’ is survival within genomes. Prokaryotic transposable elements and eukaryotic middle-repetitive sequences can be seen as such DNAs, and thus no phenotypic or evolutionary function need be assigned to them. 
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