Selfish genes, the phenotype paradigm and genome evolution

@article{Doolittle1980SelfishGT,
  title={Selfish genes, the phenotype paradigm and genome evolution},
  author={W. Ford Doolittle and Carmen Sapienza},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1980},
  volume={284},
  pages={601-603}
}
Natural selection operating within genomes will inevitably result in the appearance of DNAs with no phenotypic expression whose only ‘function’ is survival within genomes. Prokaryotic transposable elements and eukaryotic middle-repetitive sequences can be seen as such DNAs, and thus no phenotypic or evolutionary function need be assigned to them. 
The role of selfish genetic elements in eukaryotic evolution
TLDR
Diverse elements of eukaryotes, such as transposons, homing endonucleases, meiotic drive chromosomes and heritable microorganisms, are discussed and their potential importance in the evolution of genetic systems, adaptation, and the extinction and birth of species is discussed.
Symbiotic DNA in eukaryotic genomes.
The evolutionary dynamics of repetitive DNA in eukaryotes
TLDR
Features of the organization of repetitive sequences in eukaryotic genomes, and their distribution in natural populations, reflect the evolutionary forces acting on selfish DNA.
Bacterial transposon Tn5: evolutionary inferences.
TLDR
The bacterial transposon Tn5 is reviewed and those aspects of its functional organization and transposition which provide insights into how it and other elements may have arisen, proliferated, and evolved are focused on.
Transposable Elements, Epigenetics, and Genome Evolution
Transposable genetic elements (TEs) comprise a vast array of DNA sequences, all having the ability to move to new sites in genomes either directly by a cut-and-paste mechanism (transposons) or
The ecology of the genome — mobile DNA elements and their hosts
TLDR
An analogy is developed between the components of the genome, including mobile DNA elements, and an ecological community.
Rapid Evolution of Enormous, Multichromosomal Genomes in Flowering Plant Mitochondria with Exceptionally High Mutation Rates
A pair of species within the genus Silene have evolved the largest known mitochondrial genomes, coinciding with extreme changes in mutation rate, recombination activity, and genome structure.
Conserved eukaryotic transposable elements and the evolution of gene regulation
  • J. Jurka
  • Biology, Geography
    Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences
  • 2007
Abstract.Multiple remnants of transposable elements preserved in cis-regulatory modules may represent a record of mutations that were critical to the evolution of gene regulation and speciation.
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