Selfish behavior of restriction-modification systems

@article{Naito1995SelfishBO,
  title={Selfish behavior of restriction-modification systems},
  author={T Naito and Kohji Kusano and Ichizo Kobayashi},
  journal={Science},
  year={1995},
  volume={267},
  pages={897 - 899}
}
Plasmids carrying gene pairs encoding type II DNA restriction endonucleases and their cognate modification enzymes were shown to have increased stability in Escherichia coli. The descendants of cells that had lost these genes appeared unable to modify a sufficient number of recognition sites in their chromosomes to protect them from lethal attack by the remaining restriction enzyme molecules. The capacity of these genes to act as a selfish symbiont is likely to have contributed to the evolution… 
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TLDR
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Behavior of restriction-modification systems as selfish mobile elements and their impact on genome evolution.
TLDR
The capacity of RM systems to act as selfish, mobile genetic elements may underlie the structure and function of RM enzymes.
The restriction-modification genes of Escherichia coli K-12 may not be selfish: they do not resist loss and are readily replaced by alleles conferring different specificities.
TLDR
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Regulation of the activity of the type IC EcoR124I restriction enzyme.
TLDR
Type I R-M systems can be transferred to non-modified Escherichia coli cells by conjugation or transformation without killing the recipient, they must have some means to regulate their restriction activity upon entering a new host cell to avoid restriction of unprotected host DNA and cell death.
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