Selfish Genes and Plant Speciation

@article{gren2012SelfishGA,
  title={Selfish Genes and Plant Speciation},
  author={J. Arvid {\AA}gren},
  journal={Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2012},
  volume={40},
  pages={439-449}
}
  • J. Ågren
  • Published 1 September 2013
  • Biology
  • Evolutionary Biology
A key to understand the process of speciation is to uncover the genetic basis of hybrid incompatibilities. Selfish genetic elements (SGEs), DNA sequences that can spread in a population despite being associated with a fitness cost to the individual organism, make up the largest component in many plant genomes, but their role in the genetics of speciation has long been controversial. However, the realization that many organisms have evolved a variety of suppressor mechanisms that reduce the… 

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