Self-voice perception and its relationship with hallucination predisposition

@article{Pinheiro2019SelfvoicePA,
  title={Self-voice perception and its relationship with hallucination predisposition},
  author={Ana P. Pinheiro and Ant{\'o}nio Farinha-Fernandes and Magda Sofia Roberto and Sonja A. Kotz},
  journal={Cognitive Neuropsychiatry},
  year={2019},
  volume={24},
  pages={237 - 255}
}
ABSTRACT Introduction: Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) are a core symptom of psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia but are also reported in 10–15% of the general population. Impairments in self-voice recognition are frequently reported in schizophrenia and associated with the severity of AVH, particularly when the self-voice has a negative quality. However, whether self-voice processing is also affected in nonclinical voice hearers remains to be specified. Methods: Thirty-five… 
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