Self-similarity of complex networks

@article{Song2005SelfsimilarityOC,
  title={Self-similarity of complex networks},
  author={Chaoming Song and Shlomo Havlin and Hern{\'a}n A. Makse},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2005},
  volume={433},
  pages={392-395}
}
Complex networks have been studied extensively owing to their relevance to many real systems such as the world-wide web, the Internet, energy landscapes and biological and social networks. A large number of real networks are referred to as ‘scale-free’ because they show a power-law distribution of the number of links per node. However, it is widely believed that complex networks are not invariant or self-similar under a length-scale transformation. This conclusion originates from the ‘small… 
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