Self-responsibility and the self-serving bias: an fMRI investigation of causal attributions

@article{Blackwood2003SelfresponsibilityAT,
  title={Self-responsibility and the self-serving bias: an fMRI investigation of causal attributions},
  author={Nigel Blackwood and Richard P. Bentall and Dominic H. Ffytche and Andrew Simmons and Robin M. Murray and Robert Howard},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={2003},
  volume={20},
  pages={1076-1085}
}
We use causal attributions to infer the most likely cause of events in the social world. Internal attributions imply self-responsibility for events. The self-serving bias describes the tendency of normal subjects to attribute the causation of positive events internally ("I am responsible em leader ") and negative events externally ("Other people or situational factors are responsible em leader "). The self-serving bias has been assumed to serve a positive motivational function by enhancing self… Expand
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