Self-reported social networks and interpersonal support 2 years after severe traumatic brain injury.

Abstract

Fifty-four patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) consecutively admitted to a rehabilitation hospital were examined 2 years post-injury. Social interaction and support, subjective complaints, and functional status were assessed. A large variability in social interaction and support patterns was found. Most patients had more interaction and received more support from family members than from friends and neighbours. Thirty-one patients (57.4%) reported that their social networks had markedly declined subsequent to injury. Relatively short duration of coma (< 1 week) and severe sequelae in terms of low functional status and poor emotional adjustment at follow-up, especially in terms of deficits in initiating behaviour, were found to be related to little interaction and support. The importance of both provider and patient initiative in order to establish and preserve a social support network is suggested, and clinical implications briefly discussed.

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@article{Finset1995SelfreportedSN, title={Self-reported social networks and interpersonal support 2 years after severe traumatic brain injury.}, author={Arnstein Finset and S Dyrnes and J M Krogstad and J R Berstad}, journal={Brain injury}, year={1995}, volume={9 2}, pages={141-50} }