Self-repair in dialogues of schizophrenics: Effects of hallucinations and negative symptoms

@article{Leudar1992SelfrepairID,
  title={Self-repair in dialogues of schizophrenics: Effects of hallucinations and negative symptoms},
  author={Ivan Leudar and Philip N. Thomas and Margaret Johnston},
  journal={Brain and Language},
  year={1992},
  volume={43},
  pages={487-511}
}
This paper concerns the discourse features of verbal hallucinations and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. A total of 46 schizophrenics, varying in verbal hallucination and in negative symptoms status, and 22 controls were tested on the Reporter Test. The frequency with which they issued inadequate instructions, attempted to repair the inadequacies, and the success of repairs were compared. We observed that schizophrenics, on the whole, issued more wrong and incomplete instructions. This was… Expand
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