Self-recognition in primates: phylogeny and the salience of species-typical features.

@article{Hauser1995SelfrecognitionIP,
  title={Self-recognition in primates: phylogeny and the salience of species-typical features.},
  author={Marc D. Hauser and Jan Kr{\'a}l{\'i}k and Carezza Botto-Mahan and Mica Garrett and J. Oser},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={1995},
  volume={92 23},
  pages={
          10811-14
        }
}
  • M. Hauser, J. Králík, +2 authors J. Oser
  • Published 7 November 1995
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Self-recognition has been explored in nonlinguistic organisms by recording whether individuals touch a dye-marked area on visually inaccessible parts of their face while looking in a mirror or inspect parts of their body while using the mirror's reflection. Only chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans, and humans over the age of approximately 2 years consistently evidence self-directed mirror-guided behavior without experimenter training. To evaluate the inferred phylogenetic gap between hominoids… Expand

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